Qi Gong & Tai Chi with Horses

Improve your balance and reflexes with this simple, powerful practice and experience the mesmerizing effect it has on horses as we move slowly and gently through the postures.

Why I love Tai Chi . . .   

 

When I practice outside—in a field, near the woods, or a stream or river—the animals emerge.  They come closer and closer, not because I have suddenly become Snow White and they want to be with me (although that is a dream of mine), but because I become a part of the landscape.  I am the waving grass, the rushing river, the fluttering leaves.  I enter their world and discover that I am not separate from it and I never was.  I am a part of the interconnected web and the web itself.  I come into a state of “knowing,” not in the sense that I have figured something out, but in the sense that the muddy layer of separation dissolves.  Now I can “know” the bird.  Now I can “know” the river or the tree.  Now I can come back to my native language.

What is it like to be in a school of fish?  When you are moving in unison with a group, this way, then that, you lead and then you follow, but you are not “A leader” or “A follower.”  You are the movement of one to the other with nothing in the way.  There is a certain thrill in stepping into the interplay.  I still have to think to move through the form.  This engages me and keeps me alert.  When I am loyal to this, I am lead through a portal without even trying.

 

If I were to “market” tai chi to you, I’d tell you that my favorite “benefit” is what it does for my reflexes, which turn to lightening with just a little bit of practice. My instincts precede thought, yet are wholly appropriate in their guidance. Overall, I appreciate the return to knowing--not to analyze, but to be a part of and to feel the power that rises from within.  I feel the smallness and the grandness at once.  I feel the wisdom of my body and the earth as if they are one.

 

When your mind wanders during tai chi, it’s easy to lose your place, but there are others around you who can set you back into the flow.  It’s not about doing it “right” — achieving something — but about staying with it.  This is the same as staying with yourself and stepping outside yourself at once.  And as you stay with it (and yourself) more and more, compassion arises.

 

Being “a part of” teaches you about being a part of!  The one and the many, the leader and the follower, the never-ending change.  Repeating the same form of movements day to day or week to week is never the same, which highlights that I am never the same.  I am the everlasting evolution within the everlasting evolution.  I am the changer and the changeless.  I am everything and nothing.  I am the weaving in and out.  I am committed and free.

Please join me!

 

Blessings,

Susie

280616913_321200776829752_3762333223432947253_n_edited.jpg

Qigong, pronounced “chi gong,” was developed in China thousands of years ago as part of traditional Chinese medicine. It involves using exercises to optimize energy within the body, mind, and spirit to improve and maintain health and balance. Qigong involves the regulation of the mind, breath, body movements and posture.  Tai Chi originated as a martial art and is considered a form of qigong, involving focused movement through various postures. 

Min. # participants: 3, max. # participants: 15.

280454379_1140258116820316_7375244136255293853_n_edited.jpg

June 1, 2022
Wednesday
9:30am - 10:30am

280349971_7527667327303760_1319001268448076400_n_edited.jpg
IMG_1352 (1).JPG